Panpsychism

By: BenOh | January 31, 2018

Sentience is, on my analysis, the central criterion for an entity's having moral standing or moral status (meaning its well-being must be taken into consideration if it may be benefitted or harmed by a decision, action, policy, law, etc.) both within Buddhist ethics and within utilitarianism (the ethical theory that holds that the right thing to do is always whatever will produce the greatest overall good for the greatest number of individuals affected by the decision, where 'good' is usually translated to mean something like well-being or benefit, and often simply as any pleasant consequence). I'm not arguing that there are no other, equally good reasons to draw a line that differentiates between beings that have or lack moral standin...

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By: BenOh | January 30, 2018

Professor Repetti


Professor Repetti described panpsychism nicely thus:

"It is assumed generally that animals are sentient, though it is also assumed that plants are not. But sentience is the ability to sense or feel or experience, and so it seems intuitive that anything that is assumed to be sentient is experiencing some minimal form of consciousness, although not necessarily complex consciousness, such as thought.

The question of panpsychism is whether not only non-animal plants are sentient, but whether all non-animals are, and that included intimate, lifeless matter.  Panpsychism is the view that the answer is yes. 

Arthur Reber makes a compelling case for non-animal organisms and possibly any organic matter being sentient, very similar the ...

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By: BenOh | January 29, 2018

Consciousness permeates reality. Rather than being just a unique feature of human subjective experience, it’s the foundation of the universe, present in every particle and all physical matter.


This sounds like easily-dismissible bunkum, but as traditional attempts to explain consciousness continue to fail, the “panpsychist” view is increasingly being taken seriously by credible philosophers, neuroscientists, and physicists, including figures such as neuroscientist Christof Koch and physicist Roger Penrose.


“Why should we think common sense is a good guide to what the universe is like?” says Philip Goff, a philosophy professor at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary. “Einstein tells us weird things about the nature of time that cou...

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By: BenOh | August 14, 2017

By Philip Goff


Goff argues that the philosophical project of “neuro-fundamentalism” has not gone well and we need a radical reconceptualization of the mind, the brain, and the relationship between them and suggests there's more recently a quiet revolution has been occurring in philosophy of mind which aims to turn the brain-first approach on its head.


https://blog.oup.com/2017/08/electrons-consciousness-philosophy/

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By: BenOh | March 01, 2017

Common sense tells us that only living things have an inner life. Rabbits and tigers and mice have feelings, sensations and experiences; tables and rocks and molecules do not. Panpsychists deny this datum of common sense. According to panpsychism, the smallest bits of matter – things such as electrons and quarks – have very basic kinds of experience; an electron has an inner life.


The main objection made to panpsychism is that it is ‘crazy’ and ‘just obviously wrong’. It is thought to be highly counterintuitive to suppose that an electron has some kind of inner life, no matter how basic, and this is taken to be a very strong reason to doubt the truth of panpsychism. But many widely accepted scientific theories are also crazily counter to co...

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